“Like an Anvil”: The Language of the Kartlis Tskhovreba and Tamar the Great

By Irene Carstairs Twitter: @CarstairsIrene Tamar of Georgia presided over a period of unprecedented expansion, as well as an era of peace and prosperity that would never be seen in the nation again. Under her reign, Georgian historical writing began to resemble something recognisable as history, not a collection of biblical stories, folktales, and kings.Continue reading ““Like an Anvil”: The Language of the Kartlis Tskhovreba and Tamar the Great”

The Great Loves of John Hervey, Part II

By Amy-Jane Humphries This second part of our last #Pride month post delves further into sexualities and royal studies, continuing the story of John Hervey. Frederick, Prince of Wales (1707-1751) The social circle that Hervey, the Fox brothers, and Frederick ran in was defined by its sexual relationships, both heterosexual and homosexual.[1] When Frederick arrivedContinue reading “The Great Loves of John Hervey, Part II”

The Great Loves of John Hervey, 2nd Baron Hervey (1696-1743)

By Amy-Jane Humphries  For our last #Pride posts, we have a two-parter on the courtier John Hervey, his relationship with Caroline of Ansbach, queen of Great Britain and Ireland, and his role in LGBTQIA+ history! Pride Month provides a wonderful reminder that our world has been shaped by queer lives all over the world andContinue reading “The Great Loves of John Hervey, 2nd Baron Hervey (1696-1743)”

A Queen Between Two Realms: Blanca of Navarre as Sicilian Lieutenant and Navarrese Princess, 1402-1415

By Jessica Minieri (Twitter: @jessica_minieri) Cover Photo: Blanca’s initial on the ceiling of the Cathedral de Santa María la Real in Pamplona, Spain (Wikimedia Commons). In 1402, Navarrese princess, Blanca (c.1387-1441), arrived in Palermo to marry the king of Sicily, Martí “El Joven” (r. 1390-1409), in an effort to secure his throne following the deathContinue reading “A Queen Between Two Realms: Blanca of Navarre as Sicilian Lieutenant and Navarrese Princess, 1402-1415”

Christina of Sweden: Queerness and Queenship in Fiction

By Amy Saunders For the third of our #PrideMonth posts, we have a special guest post from historian Amy Saunders on the iconic Christina of Sweden! Christina of Sweden (1628-1689) inherited the throne at six years old after the death of her father Gustavas Adolphus King of Sweden. Christina’s biological sex was called into questionContinue reading “Christina of Sweden: Queerness and Queenship in Fiction”

LGBTQIA+ History: Issues of Terminology

By Gabrielle Storey This piece is the second of four for Pride Month: in this discussion we briefly look at some of the issues around terminology in historical and art studies. We will be providing a specific reference piece for royal studies and sexualities at the end of the month! The decision around what categorisationsContinue reading “LGBTQIA+ History: Issues of Terminology”

Book Review: The King’s Pearl: Henry VIII and his Daughter Mary by Melita Thomas

By Johanna Strong With the growth of revisionist Marian work, scholars have begun to challenge the traditional view of Mary I, England’s first crowned queen regnant (1553-1558), as a religious zealot and tyrant. Instead, she has been revealed as a highly competent, politically savvy queen. In this revisionist scholarship, though, Mary’s personal relationship with herContinue reading “Book Review: The King’s Pearl: Henry VIII and his Daughter Mary by Melita Thomas”

The Monarchs of Pride

By Holly Marsden Cover Image: https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2018/mar/08/rupaul-drag-race-transgender-performers-diversity Happy Pride month! To celebrate, we are going to explore a very different kind of royalty…drag queens and kings! It is firstly important to understand why the festivals, street parties and rainbow splattered vodka bottles exist. Pride celebrates queer culture, history and activism in commemorating the Stonewall Riots, whichContinue reading “The Monarchs of Pride”

Book Review: Before the Reign Falls: The Lost Words of Lady Jane Grey by David Black

By Johanna Strong *This review contains spoilers, the inclusion of which were necessary for a proper analysis of the work’s plot and character development.* As historians, we must stick to the facts. Occasionally, however, there comes a moment when every historian wonders “but what if…?”. David Black’s Before the Reign Falls: The Lost Words ofContinue reading “Book Review: Before the Reign Falls: The Lost Words of Lady Jane Grey by David Black”

The Mongolian Khatuns

By Katia Wright Many scholars of Mongolian history focus on the politics and warfare which resulted in an empire that stretched from Egypt to China. However, the absence of women in these discussions does not mean that Mongolia’s women, and indeed their khatuns (or queens), had little political, social, or economic power. Royal Mongolian womenContinue reading “The Mongolian Khatuns”